Massachusetts Association of Crime Analysts > Blog > 2013 > March > 24 > Five Things Law Enforcement Executives Can Do to Make a Difference

Five Things Law Enforcement Executives Can Do to Make a Difference

The National Institute of Justice just released a report entitled, "Five Things Law Enforcement Executives Can Do to Make a Difference"

http://nij.gov/five-things/

This is really a quick and simple summary of things that are proven to improve police operations and service. At the top of the list is the fact that crime is rarely random and police patrols should not be either. Most people who work in police departments have known this for years but for some reason most police patrols in this country are still sent out in a very random fashion assigned to respond reactively to calls for service in specified geographical areas. As technology becomes more affordable and accessible and as education and expectations rise there should be more movement towards sending police patrol forces out with a mission to work smarter.

The first step to working smarter is to use crime analysis within all levels of an agency so that the overwhelming flow of data that comes into our police departments is turned into useful information. More importantly, that information needs to be made useful for officers, supervisors and investigators in the field and it needs to be given out in a way that it can be acted upon.

Police agencies needing assistance with implementing a crime analysis function can turn to organizations such as the Massachusetts Association of Crime Analyst. Our organization exists solely to help promote the use of crime analysis and the training of crime analysts. MACA membership is very affordable at only $40 per year. This fee also includes FREE membership in the International Association of Crime Analysts. http://www.iaca.net/

We hold an annual training conference which offers world class training for new and experienced analysts. This conference also offers networking opportunities to help law enforcement analysts and leaders learn from police officers, analysts and academics from around the country and around the world. Our monthly meetings offer excellent training opportunties and valuable networking at the regional level.

No matter what type of policing you do or what you want to call your policing strategy crime analysis is the key component to get started. Agencies with little or no spare resources to dedicate to this can receive assistance if they are willing to ask for it. As always, MACA is more than willing to help.

Glen Mills – President

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